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Posted: November 25, 2011

Response #8: Setting The four purposes for setting in literature are to use the setting as a mood, to use it as an antagonist, to set a historical background, and to use it as symbolism. Authors use the setting to create the mood of the story in an effort to make stories more believable. For example, in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis, it makes much more sense for a faun, dwarf, and queen to appear in the mystical land of Narnia than in the wardrobe or even the old house itself:    " 'This is the land of Narnia,' said the Faun, 'where we are now; all that lies between the lamppost and the great castle of Cair Paravel on the eastern sea. And you - you have come from the wild woods of the west?'"(Lewis, 44) The setting can also be used as an antagonist in the plot throughout the story. A good example of this is the character-vs-setting plot in Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. The setting of the story is mainly in the wilderness following the crash of the small plane that Brian is travelling on. Brian has to fight to survive the experience of being plunged into an environment where he had few of the skills necessary to survive. The use of setting as a historical background is extremely important in non-fiction or fictional stories. The description of language, dress, and lifestyle must all be accurate in order to differentiate between the setting being described and everyday life setting. For example, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn is written in the days before the civil war. Twain's use of southern dialect and his description of the way of life, including slavery, accurately depict life in the south before the war changed society. The setting of the story can also be used as a symbol. As noted in the text, the garden door in Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden is symbolic. The rejuvenated garden symbolizes the healing of the  relationships throughout the story. Another example is in A. A. Milne's Winnie-The-Pooh:"Winnie-the-Pooh lived in a forest all by himself, and Christopher Robin lived behind a green door in another part of the wood.” ( 3) The green door could symbolize the real world where Christopher Robin lives with his stuffed bear, Edward Bear. On the other side of the door is the imaginary wood where Winnie-The-Pooh and all of his friends live. Setting describes where, when, and the context in which a story takes place. It is the backdrop for all stories. The setting of Beauty and the Beast, for example, would be France. The setting of The Great Gatsby is the 20's, and the setting of Flags of our Fathers would be the middle of a war. It is the where when and how, essentially.Prompt: In your response, explain why the setting of your story is appropriate to the plot and characters of the story. Consider the following important aspects of setting in your response and as well as the information given in the notes above. Is the description of the setting strong enough to place the reader inside of the story? If the story were to take place in a different time period would  the events in the story make sense? Does the setting help make the story believable or unbelievable? If your story could still make sense in any setting explain why this is true showing understanding of the purpose of setting in your response. (It may help to consider if your story could be told successfully in a different setting---this may provide insight into why the author chose a particular time or place.)  

Posted: November 25, 2011

Response 7:  Making Predictions Making predictions is an important part of reading. Strong readers use this technique almost unconsciously… it is a useful skill in both fiction and non-fiction reading. Using one of the books you have finished or a book that you are almost finished. Did the book end the way you thought it would? Explain why or why not? What clues did the author give you that helped you to predict what would happen next? Did you think these clues were important as you were reading or did they only make sense once you were done the story?

Posted: November 25, 2011

Section 3.9Page 155Question 4, 5, 6, 7 Unit Test will be on Wednesday November 30

Posted: November 22, 2011

Unit 3 Section 3.7Pages 145-14612, 13, 14, 16, 17

Posted: November 21, 2011

Unit 3 Section 3.7 Page 145 Questions: 4, 5, 8

Posted: November 21, 2011

Using one of the memoirs you outlined previously. Rewrite the outline to include sensory details. Using the concept that it should be like "a movie in your mind". Keep our example of "Snow Hill Sniper" in place as a model. This model given in class had great details. Your expanded memoire should be 150- 200 words.

Posted: November 21, 2011

Response #6: Suspense  The last responses have focused on plot and this response will continue to focus on plot in the fictional story you are reading.  Fictional stories build suspense using a number of strategies. What are some strategies your author is using to create suspense? Be sure to provide enough information about the suspenseful situation for me to understand it. Be sure to  explain completely why it creates suspense. Your author may be using one or more of the techniques from the notes photocopied and given to you in class or they may be using some other method. In either case explain your response fully. Note: The author may use many of the techniques listed but you should choose to explain no more than three.

Posted: November 20, 2011

Unit 3 Section 3.6Pages 139-140 

Posted: November 16, 2011

Response #1: (INTRODUCING A CHARACTER) How does your author introduce a character?   What do they look like?   What technique do they use to let the reader know?   → How does the author provideinsight into the character?   →Describe one or two traits of a character and how does the author let the reader know?

Posted: November 16, 2011

Response # 5: Sub-plots   In the last response you focused on how the story began "the introductory incident". In this response explain how the author is using sub plots or complications (the "smaller" problems) in the plot to keep the readers attention and to move the story forward.   Are the sub-plots in your book moving the story forward toward a climax orare they a distraction?    In your response you may need to use events that may extend over several pages. In this case a direct quote may not be possible so you will need to state the specific events and then put a page number after to indicate where in the book that event occurred.   For example:             In Holes, Sachar has Stanley teaching Zero to read which cause conflict with the warden, the other campers, and the guards (pages 106-116). This complication eventually leads to Zero attacking Sir. This subplot was very effective. Stanley forms a true friendship with Zero as he teaches him to read. It is through this that Zero's past is revealed. His mother use to leave Zero at the park for the day. When the boys are talking they realize this is the park Stanley played in. When Zero was abandoned by his mom he slept in that park for several nights.                Eventually Zero runs away from Camp Green Lake and once again finds himself "homeless" in a sense. Stanley from before would have been too scared to help Zero. The Stanley who has been shaped by events at Camp Green Lake eventually pursues Zero and takes care of him. There are many 'full circle moments' in this story and this is one of them. This sub plot works well as it does eventually lead to the climax and resolution of the story.  

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